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Boston Marathon: The Suspect’s Arrest And The Lessons For Bostonians…

This year’s Boston Marathon was a bloody drama and finally ended with the arrest of the second suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev brining releaf to Boston and its Watertown suburb:

Boston Marathon bombing suspect caught after day-long manhunt – Reuters

Police captured a 19-year-old ethnic Chechen suspected of carrying out the Boston Marathon bombings with his older brother after an intense day-long manhunt on Friday that closed down the city and turned a working-class suburb into a virtual armed camp. The break in the case sent waves of relief and jubilation through Boston and the suburb of Watertown, where armored vehicles roamed the streets and helicopters flew overhead through the day. Residents and police officers cheered and clapped when the suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was caught after an exchange of gunfire with police. A Massachusetts State Police spokesman said Tsarnaev was bleeding and in serious condition in a Boston hospital. He had been hiding in the stern of a boat parked in the backyard of a house in Watertown, police said. A resident called police after seeing blood on the boat. President Barack Obama told reporters at the White House after the suspect’s capture that questions remained from the bombings, including whether the two suspects received any help.

Boston Marathon, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev 1

Bostonians had a real difficult time yesterday as they notified by the authorities to stay indoors:

Bostonians Face Anxiety, Difficulty Sleeping — the Fallout of Living in Lockdown after Boston Marathon – ABC News (blog)

As law enforcement officials comb the streets of Boston in search Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, the remaining suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings Monday,  the city’s residents  try their best to cope with the added stress of living in lockdown. Anxiety and disrupted sleep could be  part of the fallout for Bostonians,  experts say. “If you’re in Boston and you’re close to the center of it, the greater the danger [of  symptoms],” said Jeff Magill, project coordinator for Behavioral Health Emergency Management at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Shut in their homes, watching live coverage of the manhunt, some people, even those not physically near the bombing or the dragnet, can experience post-traumatic stress, Magill said.“Post-traumatic stress is a typical, normal reaction,” said Magill. “You [may] see some change in your ability to adapt or be just a little bit more edgy or having more mood swings than you had before. … Those things generally subside over a couple days and couple of weeks.”

On the other hand, CISPA gives cybersecurity political approval:

Lawmakers Cite Boston Marathon Bombing, WikiLeaks “Hacking” as Reasons to Pass CISPA – Slate Magazine (blog)

North Korean hackers and the Boston bombings might not appear to have much in common. But not according to some American lawmakers, who are using both to justify passing a controversial cybersecurity bill that civil liberties advocates claim “undermines the privacy of millions of Internet users.” Yesterday, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, or CISPA, was approved by the House of Representatives by a vote of 288 to 127. The law was first introduced in 2011 and approved last year by the House, though it died in the Senate after an outpouring of opposition from privacy and civil liberties groups. But it has been resurrected and is heading to the Senate for the second time. Predictably, the storm of criticism has also reappeared. Rights groups have consistently raised concerns over how CISPA would allow corporations to pass unanonymized user data to federal government agencies for vaguely defined “cybersecurity” purposes—and be covered by full legal indemnity when doing so.

But, what the  Tsarnaev brothers mean to Bostonian’s..?:

What Boston suspects taught you after the Boston Marathon | www.bullfax.com

Like many of us, and especially those of us staying off the streets of Boston, I’ve been not knowing things all day. That’s because I’ve been watching the mainstream media as well as my favorite social media. It turns out that not knowing something reveals its own kind of truth. Yesterday, when we didn’t have a Suspect No. 1 or No. 2, we each filled in the blanks. We assumed the perpetrators were terrorists, which implies a political motive. I’m going to guess that a vast majority of us assumed that the perpetrators would be male and not very old, because that’s what our experience has shown us. We may also have filled in blanks about complexion, religion, and whether we expected them to have accents. These are more likely to show us something about how we think the world works.

Dropping the backpack..?

Boston Marathon victim Jeff Bauman helped identify bombers – Telegraph.co.uk

Mr Bauman was waiting to see his girlfriend finish the race when a man in a white cap and sweatshirt dropped a backpack at his feet. The 27-year-old lost both his legs in the explosion. Despite being heavily drugged, Mr Bauman got word to the authorities that he had seen one of the bombers. He told FBI investigators that he looked in the eyes of Tamerlan Tsarnaev as he planted the bomb. He went on to identify him in a photograph. Mr Bauman’s brother, Chris, said: “He woke up under so much drugs, asked for a paper and pen and wrote, ‘bag, saw the guy, looked right at me’.”

Finally, this year’s Boston Marathon will be remembered for the years to come for its tragic events and bloody shootings. It will bring in people’s memories the new face of city terrorists. They are common people, working or studying with other in everyday life, but they have their secret bloody motives. On the other hand, America must not stop offer true life opportunities to foreigners. The Boston bloody experience proves that the U.S. must continue to be the “land of opportunity” in today’s world. The Boston Marathon 2013, is sending its message…



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